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The Making of A Broadside Ballad

Patricia Fumerton, Andrew Griffin, Carl Stahmer, Authors

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Contributors


Katie Adkison is a doctoral student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research explores the intersections of gender and sexuality studies, affect theory, and phenomenology in the poetry and drama of the early modern era.

Charlotte Becker holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Santa Barbara. In spring 2013, her article “The Artist as Skeptic: John Everett Millais’s Ferdinand Lured by Ariel” appeared in The Journal of Pre-Raphaelite Studies. She contributed the essay "A Bower of Ballads: The Potentials of Popular Print in Our Mutual Friend" to the Our Mutual Friend Reading Project at Birkbeck University of London. She is the former Assistant Director of the English Broadside Ballad Archive.

Erik Bell is a Ph.D. candidate in Music Theory at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is working on a dissertation on chord transformations between commonly-used triads and seventh-chords in nineteenth and early twentieth century music. His research interests include Chord Transformation Theory, Tuning & Temperament/Microtonal Music, and Printed Music Notation in English Broadside Ballads. Erik is currently the Singing Team Manager for the English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), a position he has held since January, 2012. He is also the Music Director for Will Sing For Food, an informal vocal ensemble comprised of UCSB graduate students. In his spare time, he enjoys listening to Wagnerian and early-Italian opera and microtonal music, designing and brewing ales, and watching Star Trek reruns.

Caroline Bennet is Music Specialist of the English Broadside Ballad Archive, and has worked for the archive since 2009. While pursuing her graduate degree in Ethnomusicology from the University of California Santa Barbara, she researched Breton music, politics, and cultural identity, conducting fieldwork and archival research in Brittany, France. She is the co-author of a children's biography on singer Lydia Mendoza called Tejano Music Queen: Lydia Mendoza (StarWalk Kids, 2015). At Glendale Community College, she lectured in History of Jazz and Popular Music. While studying classical guitar and vocal performance at the University of Hawaii, she performed seventeenth century English lute songs in a duo at venues around Honolulu. She has been honored with many academic awards including the Ethnomusicology Department Grant at UC Santa Barbara, and the Music Department Grant at UH.

Alex Casavant is a doctoral student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests include the intersections of bodily subjectivity, imaginative failures and successes, and sexuality studies in twentieth-century British and Anglophone literature.

Jeremy Chow is a doctoral student in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research interests include the intersections of British fiction of the long eighteenth century, sexuality studies, and ecocriticism. His work here incorporates his growing investment in discussions of corporeality across the early modern period.

Phillip M. Cortes is a doctoral student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research interests include the history of rhetoric, satirical literature, and Renaissance and eighteenth-century religion, science, and philosophy. He served as the 2014-2015 Graduate Research Fellow of the Early Modern Center at UCSB.

Nicole Dib is a doctoral student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research area is post-Civil War American literature, and her research interests include race and ethnic issues in literature of the United States, questions of postmodernity as it relates to race and space, and humor studies.

Patricia Fumerton is Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Director of UCSB’s award-winning, NEH-funded English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA): http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu. In addition to many articles, she is author of the monographs, Unsettled: The Culture of Mobility and the Working Poor in Early Modern England (Chicago, 2006) and Cultural Aesthetics: Renaissance Literature and the Practice of Social Ornament (Chicago, 1991). She is also editor of Broadside Ballads from the Pepys Collection: A Selection of Texts, Approaches, and Recordings (Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 2013) as well as co-editor of Ballads and Broadsides in Britain, 1500-1800 (Ashgate, 2010) and Renaissance Culture and the Everyday (Pennsylvania, 1999). She is currently working on a new book: Moving Media, Tactical Publics: English Broadside Ballads in the Early Modern Period.

Andrew Griffin
is Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara where he writes on early modern drama, digital texts, and early modern historiography.  He is co-editor of Locating the Queen's Men (Ashgate 2009) and is currently finishing a manuscript entitled Biography, History, Catastrophe: Untimely Deaths and Renaissance Drama. 

Zach Horton is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is also a filmmaker, and received his MFA from the American Film Institute Conservatory (AFI) in 2005. His interdisciplinary research is situated at the intersections of literary theory, media theory, technology studies, and the environmental humanities. His current project focuses on technologies and discourses that mediate our access to objects that occupy radically disparate scales, such as CO2 molecules and the Earth. As a filmmaker, he worked for over four years as the director of a collaborative science fiction film Swerve, about the entanglement between the virtual and the actual in a nano-contaminated dystopia (www.swerveinterface.com).

Kristen McCants is a doctoral student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is working on a dissertation project that examines the affective responses generated by human and animal encounters in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English prose and poetic romances. She is also a project manager for the English Broadside Ballad Archive.

Megan E. Palmer received her Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2014. She is the Assistant Director of the English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA, http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu). She has an article, “Picturing Song Across Species: Broadside Ballads in Image and Word” forthcoming from Huntington Library Quarterly, and another, “Lasting Impressions of the Common Woodcut,” co-written with Patricia Fumerton, forthcoming in Ashgate Research Companion to Material Culture in Early Modern Europe. Her “Chaucer’s Chaunticleer and Animal Morality” can be found in Rethinking Chaucerian Beasts (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). She is working on a new book entitled Shakespeare’s Ballads: Printing Early Modern London.

Colton Saylor is a doctoral student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His work centers mainly on issues of race and violence in 20th Century American literature with additional interests in body theory, masculinity, and performance studies. Saylor is the co-organizer of the Anti-Racism Works Community Writing Program.

Carl G. Stahmer is the Director of Digital Scholarship at the Shields Library, University of California, Davis. Stahmer has been working in the Digital Humanities since the early 1990s when he co-founded the Romantic Circles website (http://www.rc.umd.edu) for which he served as the technical lead and Co-General Editor for the next ten years. His work has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the University of California Humanities Research Institute, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the British Society for Eighteenth Century Studies. He currently serves as Associate Director of the English Broadside Ballad Archive (http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu), as the lead developer for the ongoing Mellon-funded initiative to re-design the English Short Title Catalogue as an exemplary twenty-first century research tool (http://estc.bl.uk), and as the Technical Director for the Advanced Research Consortium (http://idhmc.tamu.edu/arcgrant/). Stahmer’s current research is focused on developing and implementing digital bibliographic tools and methods, including descriptive strategies for Linked Open Data catalogues, digital analysis and description of historical printed materials and physical media (i.e., paper, parchment, and typeset), and tools for content-based image recognition.

Alexei Taylor is an interactive designer of screen-based publishing and authoring systems. Working with scholars, academics, artists and activists to create born-digital, multimedia publications using various publishing platforms, he bridges the divide between scholarly practice and web technologies, offering conceptual advice, design/user experience counseling and development workshops. As the co-founder of TypeFold, a company that develops digital publications and software, Taylor’s focus is on a variety of authoring systems for classrooms, e-books, interactive journals, and virtual museums that utilize maps, augmented reality, streaming data and community. He has taught graduate and undergraduate classes in design and technology and uses this experience to challenge the role of interactivity, collaboration and media in pedagogy. Taylor holds an M.P.S. from NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, where he focused on digital storytelling and graphic novels.

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